Herbs, Plants, Trees and Roots | July, 2012


Winter savory has been purported to have antiseptic, aromatic, carminative, and digestive benefits.   It has also been used as an expectorant and in the treatment of stings.  The plant has a stronger action than the closely related summer savory.<br />
<br />
 Taken internally, it is said to be a remedy for colic and a cure for flatulence, whilst it is also used to treat gastro-enteritis, cystitis, nausea, diarrhea, bronchial congestion, sore throat and menstrual disorders.  It should not be prescribed for pregnant women.   A sprig of the plant, rubbed onto bee or wasp stings, brings instant relief.  <br />
<br />
The plant is harvested in the summer when in flower and can be used fresh or dried. The essential oil forms an ingredient in lotions for the scalp in cases of incipient baldness. An ointment made from the plant is used externally to relieve arthritic joints.<br />
<br />
In traditional herbal medicine, summer savory was believed to be an aphrodisiac, while winter savory was believed to inhibit sexual desire.<br />


Winter Savory

SCIENTIFIC NAME:
(Satureja Montana)

Satureja is a genus of aromatic plants of the family Lamiaceae, related to rosemary and thyme. There are about 30 species called savories, of which Summer savory and Winter savory are the most important in cultivation.
Winter Savory is a perennial herb in the family Lamiaceae, native to warm temperate regions of southern Europe.
It is a semi-evergreen, semi-woody subshrub growing to 16 in (41 cm) tall. The leaves are opposite, oval-lanceolate, 1 to 2 cm long and 5 mm broad. The flowers are small white and tubular in shape.



Common Names:

Savory



Winter Savory

Uses:

Winter savory has been purported to have antiseptic, aromatic, carminative, and digestive benefits. It has also been used as an expectorant and in the treatment of stings. The plant has a stronger action than the closely related summer savory.

Taken internally, it is said to be a remedy for colic and a cure for flatulence, whilst it is also used to treat gastro-enteritis, cystitis, nausea, diarrhea, bronchial congestion, sore throat and menstrual disorders. It should not be prescribed for pregnant women. A sprig of the plant, rubbed onto bee or wasp stings, brings instant relief.

The plant is harvested in the summer when in flower and can be used fresh or dried. The essential oil forms an ingredient in lotions for the scalp in cases of incipient baldness. An ointment made from the plant is used externally to relieve arthritic joints.

In traditional herbal medicine, summer savory was believed to be an aphrodisiac, while winter savory was believed to inhibit sexual desire.


Applications:

Tea:
Drink 1 cup in the morning and 1 at night.

Capsule:
Follow directions on label.

Oil:
Rub on afflicted areas.


Warnings:

With any herb, there is the risk of an allergic reaction. Small children and pregnant women should use additional caution when considering the use of herbal remedies.