Herbs, Plants, Trees and Roots | August, 2012

You entered Carpenter’s Weed, the more common name is...

Yarrow has a long history as a powerful 'healing herb' used topically for wounds, cuts and abrasions.  It is said the mythical Greek character, Achilles, reportedly carried it for his army to treat their battle wounds. <br />
 <br />
Tinctures have been used to treat inflammations, such as hemorrhoids, and headaches. Confusingly, it has been said to both stop bleeding and promote it. (Depending on the form it is administered; it can do both, which is why when dabbling in using herbs for medicine it is proper to contact a herbalist or other expert.  Infusions of yarrow, taken either internally or externally, are believed to speed recovery from severe bruising. The most medicinally active part of the plant is the flowering tops. They also have a mild stimulant effect, and have been used as a snuff. Today, yarrow is valued mainly for its action in colds and influenza, and also for its effect on the circulatory, digestive, excretory, and urinary systems. In the 19th century, yarrow was said to have a greater number of indications than any other herb.<br />
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Possible antiallergenic compounds can be extracted from the flowers by steam distillation. The flowers are used to treat various allergic mucus problems, including hay fever. Flowers used in this way are harvested in summer or autumn, and an infusion drunk for upper respiratory phlegm or used externally as a wash for eczema.<br />
<br />
The dark blue essential oil, extracted by steam distillation of the flowers, is generally used as an anti-inflammatory or in chest rubs for colds and influenza.<br />
<br />
The leaves encourage clotting, so it can be used fresh for nosebleeds. The aerial parts of the plant (parts above ground) are used for phlegm conditions, as a bitter digestive tonic to encourage bile flow, and as a diuretic. The aerial parts act as a tonic for the blood, stimulate the circulation, and can be used for high blood pressure; it is also useful in menstrual disorders, and as an effective sweating remedy to bring down fevers.<br />
Yarrow intensifies the medicinal action of other herbs taken with it, and helps eliminate toxins from the body.<br />
<br />
Yarrow has also been used as a food, and was very popular as a vegetable in the 17th century. The younger leaves are said to be a pleasant leaf vegetable when cooked as spinach, or in a soup. Yarrow is sweet with a slight bitter taste. The leaves can also be dried and used as an herb in cooking.<br />
<br />
Fresh or dried flower tops are tinctured; dried flowers are made into teas, capsules, skin washes, and baths. You can chew the fresh root for temporary relief of dental pain. To cleanse wounds and control bleeding, soak a cloth in strong yarrow infusion and apply it to the affected area. See dosages below.<br />

Yarrow

SCIENTIFIC NAME:
(Achillea Millefolium)


Yarrow is a hardy herbaceous pungent perennial in the family Asteraceae. It grows from 6 to 24 inches in height and has finely feathered bright gray-green leaves. The generally three to eight ray flowers are ovate to round. Disk flowers range from 15 to 40. The inflorescence is produced in a flat-topped cluster ranging in colors from white to red. The fruits are small achene. Yarrow grows at low or high altitudes, up to 3500 m above sea level. The plant commonly flowers from May through June, and is a frequent component in butterfly gardens.



Common Names:

Plumajillo, Little Feather, Milfoil, Nosebleed, Herb Militaris, Thousand Leaf, Thousand Seal, Field Hop, Arrowroot, Bloodwort, Carpenter’s Weed, Death Flower, Devil’s Nettle, Gearwe, Noble Yarrow, Snake’s Grass, Soldier’s Woundwort, Stanchweed, Woundwort, Yarroway, Yerw


Yarrow

Uses:

Yarrow has a long history as a powerful 'healing herb' used topically for wounds, cuts and abrasions. It is said the mythical Greek character, Achilles, reportedly carried it for his army to treat their battle wounds.

Tinctures have been used to treat inflammations, such as hemorrhoids, and headaches. Confusingly, it has been said to both stop bleeding and promote it. (Depending on the form it is administered; it can do both, which is why when dabbling in using herbs for medicine it is proper to contact a herbalist or other expert. Infusions of yarrow, taken either internally or externally, are believed to speed recovery from severe bruising. The most medicinally active part of the plant is the flowering tops. They also have a mild stimulant effect, and have been used as a snuff. Today, yarrow is valued mainly for its action in colds and influenza, and also for its effect on the circulatory, digestive, excretory, and urinary systems. In the 19th century, yarrow was said to have a greater number of indications than any other herb.

Possible antiallergenic compounds can be extracted from the flowers by steam distillation. The flowers are used to treat various allergic mucus problems, including hay fever. Flowers used in this way are harvested in summer or autumn, and an infusion drunk for upper respiratory phlegm or used externally as a wash for eczema.

The dark blue essential oil, extracted by steam distillation of the flowers, is generally used as an anti-inflammatory or in chest rubs for colds and influenza.

The leaves encourage clotting, so it can be used fresh for nosebleeds. The aerial parts of the plant (parts above ground) are used for phlegm conditions, as a bitter digestive tonic to encourage bile flow, and as a diuretic. The aerial parts act as a tonic for the blood, stimulate the circulation, and can be used for high blood pressure; it is also useful in menstrual disorders, and as an effective sweating remedy to bring down fevers.
Yarrow intensifies the medicinal action of other herbs taken with it, and helps eliminate toxins from the body.

Yarrow has also been used as a food, and was very popular as a vegetable in the 17th century. The younger leaves are said to be a pleasant leaf vegetable when cooked as spinach, or in a soup. Yarrow is sweet with a slight bitter taste. The leaves can also be dried and used as an herb in cooking.

Fresh or dried flower tops are tinctured; dried flowers are made into teas, capsules, skin washes, and baths. You can chew the fresh root for temporary relief of dental pain. To cleanse wounds and control bleeding, soak a cloth in strong yarrow infusion and apply it to the affected area. See dosages below.



Applications:

Tea:
Drink 1 cup in the morning until symptoms are relieved.

Tincture:
Take 1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon, two to five times a day, for treatment of upper respiratory infection, heavy menstrual bleeding, cramps, or inflammation. Start by taking it three times per day and increase or decrease as needed.

Capsule:
Take 1 or 2 capsules, two to five times a day. (See label)


Warnings:

Some people may be sensitive to salicylic acid or lactone in yarrow. If you are allergic to aspirin, you may also be allergic to yarrow. The most common indicators of sensitivity are headache and nausea.

With any herb, there is the risk of an allergic reaction. Small children and pregnant women should use additional caution when considering the use of herbal remedies.